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Thread: Brewing/drinking beer

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    Brewing/drinking beer

    (Not just for Brewer )

    So, if you like beer, what's your favorite? Personally, my favorites are porter and stout, but it depends on my mood, too. Sometimes I want smooth and creamy like a milk stout or cream stout, sometimes more "hoppy" (but seldom IPA), sometimes just a plain old amber ale. In the fall I'm often in the mood for Leinenkugel's Fireside Nut Brown (a lager), or other brands' nut brown ales.. I prefer local microbrews, Bell's is first choice (I live in Kalamazoo), then Great Lakes from Cleveland, Founders from Grand Rapids. Pete's Wicked used to be a favorite, but I never see it any more, are they still in business?

    Ever homebrew? I used to, but it's been 17-18 yrs. (My oldest son is 16. Priorities changed.) I brewed less than ten batches, never more complicated than two-stage ale, but I liked every batch. I did mead once, flavored with mulberries picked locally. It was delicious! I love the books by Charlie Papazian (relax, don't worry, have a homebrew!)

    How about you?
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  3. #2
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    Re: Brewing/drinking beer

    Quote Originally Posted by raddison0264 View Post
    (Not just for Brewer )
    Well I hope that means I can still answer lol.

    Yes I like beer. I'm from brewery Capitol of the world (more breweries here than any other city in the world). Choosing a favorite beer is like asking to determining your favorite song or movie. You can.choose a few but too hard to pick one. Rochefort 8 I'd say is my favorite if I had to choose. I generally tend to like maltier beers but there's no rule that's hard and set. I love a good ipa; the problem is its so hard to find a good one. People just try to make them as hoppy and bitter as they can. No matter what the beer is, it needs to be balanced. A well balanced ipa is no easy task. But when its done right its an amazing crisp beer. My favorite brewery would have to be rogue. Just solid beer no matter the style.

    Haven't brewed in about 8 years. Like you said, priorities change. I started with a roommate with extract but moved to all grain. It really is a fun hobby. Some of the best beers I've ever had have been homebrew. Personally I've brewed 3 amazing beers. A brown, an esb, and a "doppelbock" (I say that loosely as I used a German ale yeast vs lager). A.great beer none less.

    Do you have a particular porter or stout you like? Do you like dryer or sweeter? Try rogue Shakespearean stout if you get the chance.
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    Hm. PNW=Pacific NW? Seattle area? Portland? Bay area? ... Juneau? :-)

    I would've thought the brewery capitol = Milwaukee or St.Louis. Of course that's just where the BIGGEST ones are, not the most, or the best ones.

    I used to work for a company that made software for beverage distributors, which turns out to be 90% beer, so I learned a bit about the business. But I don't know what city currently has the most breweries. :-)

    I agree with you about balanced, but I lean more towards malty than hoppy. My favorite porter is either Great Lakes' Edmund Fitzgerald (yes, think of the Gordon Lightfoot song and a ship sinking in Lake Superior) or Arcadia London Porter (Arcadia is in Battle Creek, east of Kalamazoo). Not only because I like to support local business, but they're GOOD! :-) My favorite stout is Samuel Smith Imperial Stout, $5/pint imported from London. After that it'd be any local cream stout, or an oatmeal stout that's thick, rich, n creamy. Actually Watney's (London, better known for their "red") makes a cream stout I really like, and it doesn't cost nearly as much as Samuel Smith's.

    Thanks for the recommendation. The beer stores around me carry Rogue, but I don't think I ever tried them.

    Oh, and I never went from extract to all grain. Still loved every batch I brewed. I did use malt extract for bottling sugar, not corn sugar as some use.
    Last edited by raddison0264; 11-04-2012 at 10:04 PM.
    -Rich
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    Hey guys. I'm guessing Brewer means Portland, OR, which is considered Beervana according to the book Travels with Barley. City with the most breweries on the planet (over 40). I also homebrew. Done about 6 batches with my brother now. Still have a few left of the nut brown ale, which came out nice and roasty.

    I'm more or less a seasonal beer drinker. When it's warmer weather, I like a wheat ale, belgian style white ale, farmhouse ale, saison, pilsner, or hefeweizen. Fall time I like oktoberfests, pumpkin ales, nut brown ales. Colder weather I like porters, stouts, Sam Adams Winter Lager (very good). Then there's ones good all year around like pale ales, IPAs, dubbels, lagers (read: Yuengling)

    Favorite breweries (in no particular order):

    Dogfish Head
    Victory
    Saranac
    Smuttynose
    Six Point
    Sierra Nevada
    Sam Adams
    Yuengling
    Oskar Blues
    Southern Tier
    Last edited by Velocifero; 11-05-2012 at 08:17 AM.
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    Ooops, sorry. Forgot I only had PNW in my profile. Velo wins this round lol; I'm from portland, or (born and raised but currently live just ouside of portland).

    Velo I also tend to drink seasonally; winter seasonals tend to be some of my favorites so this is a pretty exciting time for me.

    Rad, all grain is more of a commitment for sure, but it really does give you more control over the beer and is just the next extension of the hobby. I've use powdered malt sugar and corn sugar for bottling but never liquid malt extract; how does that do? Change settiment at all? Once I got into all grain I ended up just kegging in corny kegs and carbonating with a CO2 tank.
    Last edited by Brewer; 11-05-2012 at 09:49 AM.
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    When I said malt extract for bottling, I meant dry malt extract, i.e. powdered malt sugar.

    Since I always started with a "kit" (can of hopped, liquid malt extract) and dry malt extract, then used dry malt extract while bottling, I kind of wondered if I couln't say I also did "all grain." I mean, I didn't grow the frickin barley and malt it myself, but all I used was malted barley, hops, and yeast. It's just that someone else put the hops in the can for me.

    I always had sediment in the bottles, which I don't mind a bit. Natural by-product of brewing, even many microbrews have sediment at the bottom of their bottles. It's just inactive yeast. When I start back up again (any day now, I keep telling myself) I doubt if I'll change my process at all. I figure why mess with success? :-)
    -Rich
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    One recent technique me and my brother employed was the disuse of the secondary fermentation in the glass carboy. For five batches we've used the secondary ferment, but this time we didn't after both of us did extensive Googlin. We used to do it because we thought we were purifying the beer more. But consensus was to forgo the secondary unless you're adding a special ingredient such as fruit or maybe chocolate. Otherwise, it's unnecessary and makes the beer more vulnerable to contamination or other possible errors.

    We still use the liquid malt. All grain takes too much time, money, and requires more space than the liquid version. Unless I was brewing a pumpkin ale, I stick to liquid. Yeah sediment is normal on the bottom. Just gotta remember to clean out the bottles as soon as you empty the beer from the bottle. If you wait until you bottle again, the sediment will be dryed on and sometimes very difficult to remove, even using the bottle cleaning tool.
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    Sorry, when you said malt extract I dunno why my brain thought you meant the liquid extract lol.

    I started with some extracts supplimented with other grains (steeped prior to the boiling process). You can definitely make great beers that way. I never used a kit; just got some liquid malt extract, the other grains, hops, and yeast. And obviously bottled with sugar. Aside from just the extension of the hobby, the all grain lets you control the amount of fermentable sugars which gives you that next level of control on the finished product. When I went to all grain is when my beer really started to shine for me.
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    Velo, a day of brewing really means a day of cleaning lol. Interesting on the secondary fermentation. I've done both; with lighter beers I found it helped keep the beer clearer. I think the idea behind the secondary is you "can" run into issue with the dead yeast so the secondary gives the active yeast a new jump start on life. But you also open yourself up to contamination. Probably sixes; outside of clarity, I didn't find any flavor differences in single or double fermentations.
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    I can drink just about anything except IPA's, they are too bitter but I keep trying them.

    My buddy and his Dad own a Micro Brewery out here called Small Town Brewery (Small Town Brewery Home) which is taking off huge because one of their beers they brew is a 10% Alcohol Root Beer Beer. They even brew the Root Beer for their Beer. It tastes literally just like Root Beer, and have just a few and you're feeling fantastic. They only sell it in kegs right now but thanks to my Kegerator, I'm on my 3rd one. It's incredibly good. They also brew it in 19.5% (which I've never tried) but that's as high as they can go before it's considered hard liquor and they get taxed more. He said that's not as good, nor is it as popular. Any who, I like to try a ton of different craft beers and a lot of the liquor stores are now letting you make your own 6 pack which is pretty cool, so I always grab a couple of each.

    One of my favorites ever is Delirium Tremens.
    Imperial Pump-king (obviously seasonally which I just bought a case of a couple days ago as almost all the Octoberfest beers are gone) is the best pumpkin beer I've ever had. I could go on forever but I'll stop now.
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